Political Insider

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Kemp’s closing ad asks: Are you ‘ready for a politically incorrect conservative’


Secretary of State Brian Kemp stuck to a more serious theme in his closing message in the GOP race for governor, unveiling a final TV ad Monday that sounds like a checklist for conservative issues. 

The 30-second spot comes after a serious of headline-grabbing ads featuring guns, pickup trucks, explosions and a young actor playing “Jake” helped propel him into the runoff with Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle.

“I believe in God, family and country – in that order. I say Merry Christmas and God bless you. I strongly support President Trump, our troops and ironclad borders. And I stand for our National Anthem,” he said.

“If any of this offends you, then I’m not your guy. But if you’re ready for a politically incorrect conservative who will end corrupt pay-to-play politics, I’m Brian Kemp and I’m asking for your vote.” 

In the primary, Kemp ads portraying him wielding a shotgun next to “Jake” – an actor named Jantzen McDonald purportedly courting his teenage daughter – and another with him in a pickup truck vowing to “round up criminal illegals” earned him loads of national attention and loads of free media. 

Once he landed in the runoff against Cagle, he went for a more subdued message – one ad featuring him smiling next to “Jake,” another highlights the secretly-made recording that has hampered Cagle during the final stretch of the race.

Cagle is narrowly trailing Kemp in the latest Atlanta Journal-Constitution/Channel 2 Action News poll but has a huge financial advantage. 

He’s unleashed several ads, including a spot last week showing him revving up a crowd in Gainesville. And footage of Gov. Nathan Deal, who endorsed Cagle Monday, could soon be hitting the airwaves.

Watch the ad here:

 


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About the Author

Greg Bluestein is a political reporter who covers the governor's office and state politics for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.