Political Insider

An AJC blog about Atlanta politics, Georgia politics, Georgia and metro Atlanta election campaigns. Because all politics is local.

Labor Day politicking: Abrams and Kemp hone dueling strategies


For the latest example of the contrast between Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp, look no further than this weekend’s events. 

Abrams visited Atlanta’s DragonCon festival to mingle with authors and take pictures with cosplayers “because nerds vote, too.” Labor Day brought her to union rallies, where the Democrat amplified her call for higher minimum wages for Georgians. 

Kemp spent Saturday at dove hunts in rural Georgia and low-key fundraising receptions elsewhere in the state. On Labor Day, the Republican swung by a Labor Day lunch in Thomaston to tout his plans to “keep Georgia agriculture growing.” 

Both are planning to intensify their campaigning after Labor Day as they race to seize distracted voters’ attention with summer’s end. 

Kemp unveiled a fresh ad Tuesday featuring his wife Marty, and this week’s plans include a cattleman’s lunch and an endorsement announcement on Wednesday. Abrams is gearing up for a next round of visits across the state after a recent swing that focused on economic development. 

Read more recent AJC stories about the Georgia race for governor here:

‘Too honest for politics.’ Kemp’s latest ad features a new pitch 

With Labor Day, campaigns grow intense as Kemp, Abrams soften images  

Georgia candidates for governor have mapped own paths to victory  

A boundary feud colors a ruby-red county’s view of Kemp  

A new watchdog coalition targets Georgia ‘dark money’  

Kemp: I will veto any legislation that veers from federal ‘religious liberty’ law  

Why Georgia Democrats aren’t putting Trump at center of November hopes  

Abrams takes aim at Republicans and a ‘paralyzing fear of complacency’  

Kemp unveils tax-cut proposal aimed at Georgia’s military veterans  

 

 


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About the Author

Greg Bluestein is a political reporter who covers the governor's office and state politics for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.